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HKGS2006 - Engendering Hong Kong: sociological and demographic perspectives
 
Credits: 6
Examination: No
Assessment: 100% coursework
Period: 2nd semester
Available: 2017/2018
 
 
 
Description
 

Interdisciplinary Elective Course

Hong Kong is currently unique among the world’s Chinese communities for the preponderance of females relative to males in the population. It is also remarkable for its low birth rate and growing proportion of unmarried adults. How did this remarkable situation emerge and what are its implications for the way Hong Kong people perceive of their identities in gendered terms? Using sociological and demographic approaches this course explores key issues in the transformation of Hong Kong’s gender norms. Topics include: increases in international marriages, changing attitudes to sexual morality, tensions in work-family balance, competition-aversion as contraception, changing expectations of marital partner relationships, the prohibition on concubinage but continued prevalence ‘second wives’, the significance of patriarchal gender norms as inhibitors to marriage, understanding Hong Kong’s divorce patterns, changing ideals of parenthood, transformations in expectations of childhood and the impact of China’s opening and reform on marriage choices through such phenomenon as ‘mainland mothers’.

 
 
 
 
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